PRPA INVESTS IN REVITALIZATION OF ICONIC PRINCE RUPERT LANDMARK


PRPA INVESTS IN REVITALIZATION OF ICONIC PRINCE RUPERT LANDMARK

OCTOBER 21, 2021

The Chatham Building Complex, one of Prince Rupert’s most iconic architectural landmarks, has undergone the first phase of a revitalization project aimed at protecting the multi-use building from the elements. This portion of the project was made possible through a partnership between the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s (PRPA) Community Investment Fund and the Museum of Northern British Columbia (MNBC), with additional funding from the complex’s strata partner Gitxaala Nation.

Designed and constructed in the style of a traditional cedar longhouse, the Chatham Building is Prince Rupert’s finest example of northwest Indigenous architecture. However, over time the structure’s membrane had begun to fail and critical restoration work was necessary to stop rain from seeping through the roof. Through a $125,000 contribution from PRPA’s Community Investment Fund, the gutters have been replaced and new copper and metal flashing has been added to the exterior of the building’s immense posts and beams.

“The Chatham Building is an anchor attraction for tourism in the region, and serves as a local community hub for cultural, recreational, and educational services and programs,” said Shaun Stevenson, President and CEO, Prince Rupert Port Authority. “We are delighted that one of the benefits of Port growth is contributing to its ongoing legacy, so that visitors and residents alike can continue to appreciate the building for both its stunning architectural form and many community-related functions.”

The complex is home to MNBC’s world-renowned collections, exhibits, and programming that reflects the rich culture and heritage of the Northwest Coast, particularly First Nations’ art and history. The Chatham Building also currently houses the Gitxaala Education Centre, Gitxaala Environmental Stewardship, Prince Rupert Gymnastics Club, PAC 10 Tutoring, as well as art, dance, and yoga studios.

“Thanks to the support of the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s Community Investment Fund, Chatham House will remain a fixture of Prince Rupert’s urban landscape for decades to come, and will allow our organization to continue to offer world-class cultural and educational experiences to the thousands of people who come through our doors each year,” said Susan Marsden, Director, Museum of Northern BC.

To learn more about the Community Investment Fund, visit https://www.rupertport.com/cif/.

PRPA SUPPORTS YOUTH-LED PROJECT TO REDUCE OCEAN POLLUTION

OCTOBER 13, 2021

Six new trash collection devices, specially designed to reduce ocean pollution, have been installed at four marinas around Prince Rupert and Port Edward. The Seabins were purchased by the Prince Rupert Rainmakers Interact Club thanks to a $27,500 investment from the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s (PRPA) Community Investment Fund.

These innovative garbage skimmers are part of a global network of 860 Seabins located throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Australia, and the South Pacific. The devices are equipped with an electric submersible pump that draws water from the surface into a bag which traps floating refuse, including microplastics as small as two millimetres. With an average catch of 1.5 kilograms of waste per day, each Seabin can collect nearly half a tonne of debris each year. 

“It is inspiring to see the young members of the Rainmakers Interact Club making an impact on both local and global levels through the Seabin project,” said Shaun Stevenson, President and CEO, Prince Rupert Port Authority. “Their efforts to promote and invest in sustainable solutions that benefit the environment and the community sets an example for current and future generations, and we are proud to be a part of this initiative through our Community Investment Fund.” 

The Rainmakers Interact Club launched its campaign to buy the Seabins with support and guidance from the Prince Rupert Rotary Club, which sponsors the Charles Hays Secondary School service group. Through the collaboration, the young volunteers worked hard to drum-up community support by hosting multiple bottle drives and pursuing contributions from several local businesses and service organizations. The Interact Club successfully raised more than $62,000 and over the summer helped deliver Seabins to the Cow Bay Marina, Prince Rupert Yacht Club, Rushbrook Harbour and Port Edward Harbour Authority. 

“We are grateful to be able to give back to our community by keeping it clean,” said Faith Long, President of the Rainmakers Interact Club. “The Interact Club extends its appreciation to the Prince Rupert Port Authority and other Port partners including DP World-Prince Rupert and AltaGas, for their support on this important global sustainability initiative.” 

QUICK FACTS ABOUT SEABINS:

  • Seabins are coated with a repellant material, designed to protect wildlife and aquatic life from becoming stuck.
  • Worldwide, Seabins collect 3,600 kg of garbage each day, and to date they have captured more than 2.1 million kilograms of waste. 
  • Globally, the most commonly caught items are: cigarette butts (29%), plastic pieces (28%), food wrappers (26%), foam pieces (5%), bottle caps (4%), straws/stirrers 2%, cans (1%), and bags (1%).

To learn more about the Community Investment Fund, visit https://www.rupertport.com/cif/.

PRPA INVESTS IN SPECIALIZED MEDICAL EQUIPMENT FOR MILLS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

PRINCE RUPERT, BRITISH COLUMBIA – The Women’s Wellness Centre and Colposcopy Clinic at Mills Memorial Hospital in Terrace is now better equipped to serve patients from across Northwest BC thanks to a $19,500 Prince Rupert Port Authority (PRPA) investment. 

The Dr. REM Lee Hospital Foundation received the contribution by way of PRPA’s Community Investment Fund to support the purchase of a new OmniScope Hysteroscopy and Fluent Fluid Management System, saving patients from travelling outside the region for critical diagnostic and follow-up treatments.

This new uterine scope and fluid management system is the best available equipment to diagnose and treat uterine polyps, post-menopausal complications, pre-cancers, and cancers. It allows for physicians and nursing staff to carry out a minimally invasive procedure to biopsy and remove cancerous uterine masses and fibroids safely and with precision.

“These tools have significantly improved our ability to serve patients from across the Northwest with various gynecologic conditions, including endometrial pathology and infertility,” said Dr.

Dawid Van Rensburg, Chief of Staff, Mills Memorial Hospital. “Utilizing the Hysteroscopy and Fluent Fluid Management Systems enables us to provide care in a much less invasive fashion and significantly reduces the risk of complications.”

Port investment, new terminals and growing international trade volumes through the corridor continue to contribute to economic, employment and financial health across northern BC. The Prince Rupert Port Authority contributes a significant portion of its net income to community projects that can make ongoing contributions to the quality of life of local residents.

“Over the last decade, the Prince Rupert Port Authority has made over $400,000 in investments towards healthcare projects by way of our Community Investment Fund,” said Shaun Stevenson, President & CEO of the Prince Rupert Port Authority. “This project’s ability to secure a higher standard of healthcare for women throughout Northwest BC is something the Prince Rupert Port Authority is proud to support.”

Mills Memorial Hospital provides service to more than 100,000 people, from communities as far west as Haida Gwaii, as far east as Burns Lake and as far north as the Yukon border, including numerous Indigenous communities. According to the BC Cancer Society, an estimated 930 women in British Columbia will be diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2021.

NEW PORT OF PRINCE RUPERT GATEWAY COUNCIL SHARES ECONOMIC IMPACT STATS AND CELEBRATES JOB GROWTH

SEPTEMBER 22, 2021

Port of Prince Rupert employers, industries and labour organizations have launched the Port of Prince Rupert Gateway Council (Gateway Council) and released an economic impact study that revealed strong employment benefits associated to the movement of trade through the Prince Rupert Gateway that helped offset the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Prince Rupert Gateway supports the movement of goods through the Port of Prince Rupert to and from domestic and international markets. Over the last decade, this movement of goods has increased by over 100% to a record 32.4 million tonnes of cargo in 2020, thanks to the vast contributions of Gateway partners.

The Gateway Council will work together to identify and advocate for Gateway supply chain improvements to ensure sustainable growth of the gateway that benefits Port partners, their employees, local and Indigenous communities, and all Canadians who rely on the free-flowing movement of trade.

Gateway Council members include the Prince Rupert Port Authority, CN, Ridley Terminals Inc., Prince Rupert Grain, DP World Canada, Pinnacle Renewable Energy, AltaGas Ltd., Pembina Pipeline, Ray-Mont Logistics, Quickload Logistics, Coast 2000 Terminals, Gat Leedm Logistics, Vopak Canada and the International Longshore & Warehouse Union.

The economic impact study released today by the Gateway Council analyzed the 32.4 million tonnes shipped in 2020 through the Port of Prince Rupert and its trade corridor, and quantified economic and employment benefits for northern BC. The study was based on surveys of businesses directly involved in the transportation of goods through Northern BC, including rail, trucking, logistics, port terminals, marine services, and government agencies.

The study found that growing cargo volumes moving through the Prince Rupert Gateway continued to translate into significant economic benefits for communities throughout the northern BC corridor. While the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 dampened outcomes associated with some lines of trade, strong performance in other sectors played a key role in providing economic and employment stability in the Gateway and the northern BC region as a whole. The Gateway continued to demonstrate its resiliency, efficiency, and reliability as a key strategic trade corridor for Canada and an economic engine for local communities.

The economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic were particularly acute in tourism-related businesses tied to cruise and ferry visitors, but also impacted container volumes and related employment numbers. Growth in cargoes and terminals related to coal, wood pellets and propane were important counterweights and highlighted the value of cargo diversification moving through the Port.

2020 Economic Impact Study highlights include (% change vs. 2018 levels):

• 32.4 million tonnes of cargo was valued at $60 billion in 2020
• Total economic output from port industry activity increased 7% to $1.4 billion
• Direct full-time employment in gateway businesses increased 3% to 3700 jobs
• Total job growth, including indirect and induced employment, increased 9% to 7800 jobs
• Total wages from direct employment in gateway businesses increased 17% to $360 million
• Average annual wage in gateway businesses increased 14% to $95,000 per full-time worker

Gateway activity also supported over $147 million in taxation revenue for all levels of government through associated stipends, personal tax, corporate tax, and property tax revenues. The federal and BC governments are the largest recipient of tax revenue, but local governments increased revenues by 22% to $12 million from Port properties.

Learn more about the Prince Rupert Gateway Council Economic Impact Study at www.rupertport.com/economic-impact/.

QUOTES FROM GATEWAY COUNCIL PARTNERS

“The ongoing growth and expansion at the Port of Prince Rupert has provided new job opportunities and wage increases for our members, helping to provide stability and support for their families and local community”, said Rob Ashton, President, ILWU Canada. “I am happy to be a member of the Gateway Council to ensure we continue to work together so these economic benefits are realized for generations to come.”

“The growth of the Port of Prince Rupert has been a result of the strong relationships we’ve all used to develop innovative, proactive supply chain solutions here,” said Mark Lerner, Vice-President, Marketing & Business Development, CN.

“We are proud to be a member of the Gateway Council and to contribute to the local economy with our Ridley Island Propane Export Terminal,” said Randy Toone, Executive Vice President and President of Midstream for Calgary-based AltaGas. “The Port is a critical partner of ours in facilitating our propane export safely and reliably. We are committed to our ongoing collaboration and growth of the Port into the future.”

“Sustainable development around the Port of Prince Rupert is vital to creating local employment and economic opportunities for years to come,” said Janet Loduca, Senior Vice President, External Affairs & Chief Legal and Sustainability Officer, Pembina Pipeline Corporation. “This essential connection point ensures Canada is competitively positioned to provide reliable and responsibly sourced energy to the world, and Pembina is proud to be a part of that solution. As a member of the Gateway Council, we are committed to ensuring that trade is delivered safely and sustainably so that everyone benefits from the growth of Prince Rupert’s gateway.”

“This study continues to emphasize that the Port of Prince Rupert isn’t just a Prince Rupert story—its an industry that’s growing in communities throughout northern BC and serves a vital link to market for Canada’s farmers and our agricultural industry,” said Jason Fletcher, President, Prince Rupert Grain. “The region continues to prove itself to be a global player and is reaping the benefits of that with strong employment and wage growth.”

“Growth and diversification in the port industry continues to be economically beneficial for northern BC,” said Charles Raymond, President & CEO, Ray-Mont Logistics. “We are committed to ensuring that trade is also delivered safely and sustainably so that everyone can appreciate the benefits of gateway growth.”

“As an enabler of trade, DP World is proud to play a role in the economic growth of the region through our investments in infrastructure and employment creation,” said Maksim Mihic, GM & CEO, DP World (Canada) Inc. “The Port of Prince Rupert is a vital gateway to the North American market – providing Canadian exporters a strong competitive advantage in the Asia Pacific region.”

“The Prince Rupert Port Authority is delighted to see the longterm, successful partnership amongst key Gateway contributors formalized through the formation of the Gateway Council,” said Shaun Stevenson, President & CEO of Prince Rupert Port Authority (PRPA). “Collectively, the shared vision of a prosperous and vibrant northern BC economy built on a competitive international trade corridor is becoming a reality that is only further strengthened through collaborative effort.”

PRPA SUPPORTS SUNKEN GARDENS GREENHOUSE PROJECT

EFFECTIVE July 30, 2021

PRINCE RUPERT, BRITISH COLUMBIA – The Prince Rupert Sunken Gardens, a central landmark of the city for more than eight decades, is home to a new greenhouse that was installed through a partnership between the Prince Rupert Garden Club and the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s (PRPA) Community Investment Fund. The project allows the Club to provide new opportunities to educate community members about gardening and growing food in a greenhouse.

Since taking over restoration and maintenance of Sunken Gardens from the Province of British Columbia in 2003, the Prince Rupert Garden Club has used the space as a teaching garden, to help people learn about environmentally sustainable gardening practices. By adding the greenhouse, the Club now has a place for Garden Club members and other community groups to gain knowledge about greenhouse growing methods, so they can independently grow a variety of vegetables.

“We are grateful to partner once again with the Prince Rupert Port Authority to create this new asset for the community,” said Andrée Fawcett, Prince Rupert Garden Club President. “Our Club is now able to provide people with a place to gain the skills needed to grow their own food, while also generating a new source of fresh produce that we can share with local non-profit organizations that support food security.”

On top of creating a new teaching space, the greenhouse is also being used for practical purposes, such as protecting delicate perennials and shrubs through the winter months. Equipped with electrical and water service, the structure is also designed to be extended in the future, should the need arise. 

“The greenhouse project promotes the exchange of knowledge and is empowering community members to become more self-sufficient, all while helping enhance one of the beautiful places in our city,” said Shaun Stevenson, President & CEO, Prince Rupert Port Authority. “The Prince Rupert Port Authority is proud to continue to support the legacies of both the Prince Rupert Garden Club and the Sunken Gardens through our Community Investment Fund.”

PRPA contributed over $11,250 to cover the cost of the greenhouse project. It had previously partnered with the Prince Rupert Garden Club, investing $50,000 in electrical and irrigation infrastructure to improve Sunken Gardens.

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ABOUT THE PRINCE RUPERT PORT AUTHORITY’S COMMUNITY INVESTMENT FUND:

The Community Investment Fund is financed by a share of the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s annual net income that has been dedicated to improving the quality of life for residents of the North Coast. By investing these funds into community projects, led mostly by dedicated local volunteers, the Port Authority has been able to share its financial success with the communities that enable it. To date, PRPA has committed over $380,000 to local community kitchens, greenhouses and food security projects. Since 2009, more than $14.3 million dollars have been committed to the Fund, helping to make more than 85 local projects come to life. Each of these projects has filled an important role in supporting arts and culture, recreation, health and wellness, youth, education, the environment, and other needs in the community.

Shore power will reduce container vessel emissions at Port of Prince Rupert

Vessels berthed at Fairview Terminal will be able to switch to electric power

July 5, 2021 | IMPRESS

Jason Scherr, PRPA’s Manager of Environmental Sustainability, has spearheaded the shore power project at Fairview Terminal.

While construction crews gear up to expand Fairview Container Terminal, there is a simultaneous project underway to help reduce greenhouse gases and other emissions from the ships that call on the facility. A team led by the Prince Rupert Port Authority is installing shore power capacity at the terminal, so that vessels docked there can rely on hydroelectric power while their cargo is loaded and unloaded.

“Container vessels at berth will be able to shut down their main engines when plugged into shore power, eliminating the majority of the greenhouse gases and other air emissions from those ships,” said Jason Scherr, PRPA’s Manager of Environmental Sustainability, who has spearheaded the shore power project.

Earlier this year, staff from PRPA, BC Hydro, and DP World Prince Rupert worked with electrical contractors and the engineers aboard the ship CSCL Summer to successfully test the equipment at the terminal. Scherr said, “work continues, and we expect to commission both berths and have the equipment operational when the next phase of the Fairview Terminal expansion is completed in 2022.”

The shore power project is part of PRPA’s own Carbon Reduction Strategy, which aims to reduce the Port’s greenhouse gas intensity by 30 percent from 2018 levels by the year 2030 and reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. According to Scherr, “the emissions savings from shore power at Fairview Terminal will help PRPA account for half of this aggressive reduction target.”

“Our local and regional efforts have a global impact.”

Lowering or eliminating emissions at the Prince Rupert Gateway is a constant process, that relies on the commitment of many Port partners and stakeholders to make their own investments in green technology. Beyond providing a power source for vessels, PRPA offers direct financial incentives to encourage members of the shipping industry to modernize their fleets. Through its Green Wave program, PRPA rewards ship owners by lowering fees for commercial vessels that exceed environmental performance standards.

“At the Prince Rupert Port Authority, we strive to advance stewardship and sustainability through collaboration,” said Scherr. “We hold ourselves to a high standard, but we cannot implement broad changes on our own. By working together with other organizations and businesses, through initiatives like the shore power project and Green Wave program, our local and regional efforts have a global impact.”

Learn more about the PRPA’s carbon reduction strategy at rupertport.com/sustainability

PRPA SUPPORTS RENOVATIONS AT FRIENDSHIP HOUSE OF PRINCE RUPERT

EFFECTIVE JULY 2, 2021

PRINCE RUPERT, BRITISH COLUMBIA – The Friendship House of Prince Rupert’s lobby is now a more welcoming and efficient space for the thousands of people who regularly come through their doors. The reception and front hallway areas were renovated through a partnership with the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s (PRPA) Community Investment Fund, as part of a multi-phase modernization project, with the goal of providing Friendship House staff and clients a vastly improved environment for program delivery.

To accommodate the growing needs of the organization and handle the traffic coming in and out of the Friendship House, the entrance and reception spaces have been completely overhauled. The area has a new doorway, flooring, walls, ceiling, lighting, stairwell, and office space. There are also new security features allowing staff to control who is admitted into the main part of the building. PRPA contributed $62,500 to the project, covering half of the total cost.

“This renovation has greatly improved our ability to serve our clients by creating a safer, more secure, and more inviting space for them to sign-in for programs, receive referrals, access washrooms, and socialize with friends,” said Anna Zanella, Executive Director, Friendship House Association of Prince Rupert. “We are grateful to the Prince Rupert Port Authority for its continued support in modernizing our facilities, which helps us to enhance our services and bring more people together under our roof.”

The Friendship House of Prince Rupert is part of a nationwide network of Friendship Centres, and has been serving the community since 1958, offering educational, cultural, health, and recreational programs with an emphasis on assisting Indigenous people in an urban setting. In addition to serving Prince Rupert, Friendship House supports several surrounding communities including Port Edward, Metlakatla, Gitxaala, Lax Kw’alaams, Hartley Bay, and Haida Gwaii, with an average 100,000 client interaction a year through more than 30 programs and services.

“The Friendship House of Prince Rupert has an immeasurable impact on North Coast communities, and we are proud to support their efforts to enrich the lives of residents of all ages,” said Shaun Stevenson, President and CEO, Prince Rupert Port Authority. “Through this Community Investment Fund project, we are enabling their dedicated staff to better accommodate clients and continue to provide a high standard of service and care for decades to come.”

In addition to the new construction, the lobby now features stunning new artwork by local artist, Lucy Woodman called ‘Whales and Waves’. The design depicts a family of black fish swimming by moonlight to urban areas, to find a home away from home in the Friendship Centre movement.

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ABOUT THE PRINCE RUPERT PORT AUTHORITY’S COMMUNITY INVESTMENT FUND:

The Community Investment Fund is financed by a share of the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s annual net income that has been dedicated to improving the quality of life for residents of the North Coast. By investing these funds into community projects, led mostly by dedicated local volunteers, the Port Authority has been able to share its financial success with the communities that enable it. Since 2009, more than $14.3 million dollars have been committed to the Fund, helping to make more than 84 local projects come to life. Each of these projects has filled an important role in supporting arts and culture, recreation, health and wellness, youth, education, the environment and other needs in the community.

HATCHERY UPGRADES SUPPORT BULKLEY RIVER COHO AND CHINOOK SALMON STOCKS

Efforts to improve and monitor wild Coho and Chinook salmon stock productivity in Northwest BC have received a significant financial boost from the Prince Rupert Port Authority (PRPA). The Toboggan Creek Salmon & Steelhead Enhancement Society has received a $60,000 commitment from PRPA’s Skeena River Salmon Enhancement Program to upgrade aging infrastructure at the Toboggan Creek Hatchery northwest of Smithers. These improvements will help the volunteer-led organization carry on their operations safely and sustainably for years to come and allow them to continue to directly contribute to Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s management of Pacific Northwest salmon fisheries.

Initially built in 1985 as a five-year pilot project, the Toboggan Creek Hatchery has outlived its intended lifespan and upgrades are underway to modernize and improve biosecurity at the facility. The funds from PRPA are going towards the revitalization of the hatchery’s outdoor earthen rearing ponds, where its Coho and Chinook salmonid fry are raised. The project includes removing old wooden dividers that separate the stock and replacing them with more durable steel versions, as well as reshaping the ponds and lining them with aggregate.

“These upgrades will provide our fish a safe and productive place to rear, and ensure we can keep our stocks separated,” said Kris Bulloch, Toboggan Hatchery Manager. “Our hatchery is the only Coho indicator stock in the Skeena watershed and we are grateful to receive support from the Prince Rupert Port Authority’s Skeena River Salmon Enhancement Program, as it reinforces our efforts and reaffirms our shared commitment to improving the health and vitality of wild salmon populations.”

Through its ongoing assessment activities, Toboggan Creek Hatchery has been providing uninterrupted Coho salmon exploitation, ocean distribution, and survival data for 35 years. The field data and samples gathered from the facility’s spring smolt trapping, mid-summer coded wire tagging and marking, and fall adult assessment fence operations directly inform Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Pacific Northwest Coho salmon fishery and determine the annual allowable commercial retention of ocean-going Coho.

“For more than three and a half decades, the Toboggan Creek Hatchery has played a crucial role in salmon stock productivity in Northwest BC, and the rearing pond upgrade project perfectly aligns with the Skeena River Salmon Enhancement Program’s mandate to support salmon productivity in the Skeena River watershed,” said Shaun Stevenson, President & CEO, Prince Rupert Port Authority. “By committing to locally-driven projects further upstream, especially on the Bulkley River and other tributaries, we have a greater chance of restoring salmon populations throughout the region.”

ABOUT THE SKEENA RIVER SALMON ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM:

The Skeena River Salmon Enhancement Program was established by the Prince Rupert Port Authority in 2019 with a $1 million endowment from its Community Investment Fund. The goal of the program is to team up with regional partners such as First Nations, non-governmental organizations, and community groups on projects that enhance the salmon population and protect their habitat in the Skeena River and its watershed. The program also provides the opportunity to partner with other agencies and organizations leading similar initiatives to leverage additional financial resources toward this important priority. In addition to monetary support, PRPA is also seeking ways to share capacity and data from its existing environmental stewardship programs to enhance new and existing salmon-related initiatives.

Gateway Operators monitor marine traffic and conditions 24/7

Giuliana Hauknes is on a team of Gateway Operators who monitor marine traffic in and around the Port of Prince Rupert, to help maintain the highest standards of safety and security. (Photo: Michael Ambach)

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Helping vessels big and small safely navigate the Port of Prince Rupert

June 21, 2021 | IMPRESS

From fishing boats bringing in their fresh catch and kayaks bobbing on the waves of the inner harbour, to the large shipping vessels anchored further out, the waters around Prince Rupert are used for diverse activities. Who keeps track of everything coming and going, and ensures the safety and security of people, the environment and property?

When it comes to planning, monitoring and managing large vessel movements, the Prince Rupert Port Authority (PRPA) coordinates with the Canadian Coast Guard and BC Coast Pilots from its Port Security Operations Centre (PSOC). It’s a central hub of advanced technology and trained staff, who are monitoring activity around the Prince Rupert Gateway, ensuring an effective and efficient response to any incident within PRPA’s jurisdiction.

The state-of-the-art PSOC opened in 2017, and last year PRPA created a new role that would further integrate security and marine safety operations at the facility. The Port’s new team of Gateway Operators are cross trained, rotating through different positions on both land and on the water, by working in PSOC, conducting administrative tasks, and serving with the Harbour Patrol Vessel Crew. Gateway Operator Giuliana Hauknes joined the team in 2020. Born and raised in the community, she was excited to take on a new role that supports safety for everyone that uses the harbour, whether it’s for work or recreation.

“Day and night, our team is the eyes and ears of the Port of Prince Rupert, no matter the conditions we are ready to respond,” said Hauknes. “We provide an important service to our Gateway partners and to the broader community, by putting their safety and security at the forefront. As the Port develops and expands, as a Rupertite it is reassuring to know our team has the skilled staff and high-tech tools needed to help it grow sustainably.”

Infrastructure investments to make a safe port even safer

To carry out their day-to-day operations, Gateway Operators track information using satellite and radar technology, as well as live harbour data collected from around the Prince Rupert Gateway. Much of this information, including measurements on currents, wave height, and wind speed, is available in real-time to the public on PRPA’s website. With a few clicks of a button, anyone can view readings from the three new current sensors placed at Fairview and Pembina Terminals, and in Porpoise Channel. They can also track data from two new tide sensors at those terminals, along with new wind and wave sensors in the Inner Harbour, at Flora Bank, and Triple Island.

“This information not only helps inform our efforts to maintain the highest safety standards for Port-related activity, but it also supports the other users of the Prince Rupert Harbour. Anyone who is planning a trip on the water, whether it’s a fishing or passenger vessel, can benefit from our live harbour data,” said Hauknes.

To learn more about how PRPA helps manage marine safety visit www.rupertport.com/sustainability/.

Air and water quality at the Port measured around-the-clock

Port Authority is eyes and ears along the coast tracking conditions above ground and underwater

June 14, 2021 | IMPRESS

Adam Simons is the Environmental Coordinator at PRPA. The Environmental Sustainability team collects and shares information related to emissions, noise, and water quality from around the Prince Rupert Gateway, to mitigate the Port’s impact on the environment and the community.

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Preserving and maintaining a high standard of air and water quality around the Port of Prince Rupert is a complex effort, that starts with extensive monitoring. The Environmental Sustainability team at the Prince Rupert Port Authority is constantly collecting data related to emissions, noise, and water quality from around the Prince Rupert Gateway, to mitigate the Port’s impact on the environment and the community.

Adam Simons is the Environmental Coordinator at PRPA, who helps ensure that flow of information is accurate and consistent. His role includes operating PRPA’s monitoring stations and equipment, installed at several locations around the Prince Rupert area. Much of the real-time data collected from those instruments is available to the public 24/7, in easy-to-read graphs on the Port’s website.

“The Prince Rupert Port Authority’s monitoring efforts are a key part of its commitment to understanding and mitigating the Port’s impact on the community, and publicly sharing the information helps us build trust and demonstrate to community members that we take our responsibility seriously,” said Simons.

Tracking trends and identifying areas of concern

The information gathered at PRPA’s two air monitoring stations, at Westview and Fairview Terminals, helps establish baselines for air quality, through the measurement of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and tropospheric ozone. Similarly, PRPA helps maintain the integrity of the marine environment through water testing in several ways. Water quality is tracked in real-time at two installations on Digby Island and at Atlin Terminal. The equipment, which is managed by PRPA partners Ocean Networks Canada, measures a range of data, including turbidity, temperature, salinity and more.

“PRPA’s Environmental team also regularly collects water samples from different locations around the region. All this data helps scientists track changes over time and identify areas of concern,” said Simons.

The extensive environmental work that Simons’ team does not only helps support transparency and keep the public informed, but it also plays a crucial role in guiding PRPA’s environmental management and future development, ensuring it’s done in a safe, environmentally sound, and economical manner. As a long-time Prince Rupert resident, contributing to this effort and evolution for the Port is a source of pride for Simons.

“I’ve been raising my family here for five years now, and it is reassuring to know that while the port grows and we get to experience the economic and social benefits that growth brings to the community, the local environment is actively being monitored and preserved for my kids and future generations to enjoy.”

You can learn more about PRPA’s environmental leadership and transparent engagement at rupertport.com/sustainability.